Welcome!

Welcome!

Tuesday, May 21, 2019

東京理科大学 Writing & Composition 1a: 5/20 board notes & Word formatting・5月20日のボードノートとWordフォーマット

Hello!


How are you? As promised in yesterday's (5/20) class, here are the board notes plus a scan of a correctly-formatted document below

Take a look at the following scan. It's from a Word document of a sample student composition that is correctly-formatted, with notes about the formatting

The resolution is not the greatest - but if you make the image larger, you can see the notes on it




I hope these can help you in your formatting of your Word documents. 

See you next week! Take care!

Images: Personal photograph & scans. All rights reserved.

Saturday, May 18, 2019

東京理科大学 Listening & Speaking 1a: 1st presentation topic・プレゼンテーション 1

Hello!



How are you? Today I will show you about our first (1st) presentations for this class

Topics
Here are your choice of topics. You can choose one (1) of these

    Problems and issues of international relations 
    Issues and solutions about the environment
    Facts and other interesting things about space or our solar system

Deadline (締め切り)
Your presentation day will be on June 10th (6/10), so you have three (3) weeks to prepare them. Please be ready on the day to present

Guidelines
1. Prepare a rough draft of a summary (要約) about the topic you want to present on. The summary will be due next week (5/27)

The summary should have a short introduction showing the topic and any issues or problems, or interesting points about it. Then you should show what you will then present on with these issuesproblems, or points are. It should be short, and indicate (指し示して) what aspect of the topic (話題の向きyou will present onHere is an example:

例えば:While the Earth has the volume of water to sustain life, researchers believe that traces of water exist on the other planets of the Solar System. This presentation will look at the planets in our Solar System that are likely to have water, and if so, what kinds of life they may be able to sustain. 


2. You will see a topic preparation sheet that comes with the handout. You do not have to use this sheet if you feel it is not useful for you - but you may find it useful as working record of your preparation about your topic. It could help you to organize ideas and steps for your presentation preparation. 

*You will also see a student evaluation sheet, with a space at the top to write the final draft of your summary. You will not evaluate your own presentation! Instead, all of you will be in groups, and present to each other in groups. You will mark your classmates' presentations in your groups, and they will mark your presentation.


After we are finished with the presentations, you will hand in the evaluation sheet with your final summary to me. 

3. Be ready for me to review your progress next week (5/27). I will let you work on your presentations in-class. On 6/3, we will practice our presentations in-class. You can practice with me and/or other groups of students.

* This is very important! You don't have to have the presentation 100% finished on 5/27 - but you have to have enough content so you can work more on it to the finish and be ready to practice on 6/3!

4. Finalize your presentation outside of class and be ready to present on the day of your class!

NEW: Here are the board notes for the class on 5/20:


    Good luck! See you next time!

    Image: By Ralf Rebmann - Wikimedia Deutschland, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=76386755

    東京理科大学 Listening & Speaking・Writing & Composition 1a: The Solar System・太陽系

    Hello!



    How are you? Here are some pictures of some of the planets (惑星) and dwarf planets (準惑星) in the Solar System (太陽系). The picture above is one of the most famous of the planets we know - Jupiter (木星), the largest planet of the Solar System.

    Before we begin, here are the lesson board notes from last week's (5/13) classes.

    Listening & Speaking 1a:


    Writing & Composition 1a:


    Now let's go to some planets of the Solar System!

    Activity
    Let's look at these planets. What do you know about them? 


    Venus (金星) 

    Saturn (土星)


    Mercury (水星) 


     Pluto (冥王星)


    Eris (エリス)

    For the Listening & Speaking class students - now let's move on to the discussion circles!

    Discussion circles

    Here is our discussion circle questions about the Solar System

    As before, if there are only three (3) members in your group, the leader should also be the vocabulary master. The summarizer or details master should ask the leader questions about vocabulary from the lecture or reading.


    Activity

    Leader questions
    For the summarizer
    Are you ready to summarize the reading/CD talk? (Can you give us your summary of the reading/CD talk?) 

    For the details master
    1. How long ago was the Solar System formed?
    2. What kind of star is the Sun? 
    3. What are the four inner planets made of?
    4. What are the last four planets called?

    (Leaders - think of two (2) more questions of your own from the lecture or reading to ask the details master!)

    For the vocabulary master
    1. What is a moon
    2. What is an asteroid
    3. What is a dwarf planet
    4. What is a gas giant?

    (Leaders - think of two (2) more words of your own from the lecture or reading to ask the vocabulary master!)

    I hope this helps you with your understanding about this topic.

    Extra outside research (for students interested in this topic)

    Choose two (2) of these planets, and research about them. Note down things such as: 
    • Their distance from the Sun
    • Orbits and how long they take to revolve around the Sun
    • Surface temperatures
    • Length of days and nights
    • Any other interesting points you might find about them
    Have fun! See you next time!

    Images: Top - by NASA, ESA, and A. Simon (Goddard Space Flight Center) - http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/heic1410a/ or http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2014/24/image/b/, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=32799232/Venus - by NASA or Ricardo Nunes - http://www.astrosurf.com/nunes/explor/explor_m10.htm, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=338424/Saturn - by NASA - http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/imgcat/html/object_page/vg1_p22994c.html (image link), Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5956746/Mercury - by NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington - NASA/JPL.Edited version of Mercury in color - Prockter07.jpg by jjron (cropped to square)., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=24301424/Pluto - by NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory / Southwest Research Institute - http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/Multimedia/Science-Photos/image.php?gallery_id=2&image_id=243, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=45707703/Eris - by ESO/L. Calçada and Nick Risinger (skysurvey.org) - http://www.eso.org/public/images/eso1142a/, CC BY 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=17153692

    Tuesday, May 14, 2019

    電気通信大学 ASE & AE2Y I: Final notes・最後の付記

    Hello!



    How are you? Here are some final notes for all of you in the ASE and AE2Y I classes

    Above are the lesson board notes for today's classes. Below are the supporting board notes for both classes today, with some extra supporting notes for the AE2Y I class only. But first - if you would like a refresher on the post for our class today about the summary review and notes on outlines, click here.  


    Take a look at these!



    ASE & AE2Y I:


    For anybody who still needs to check their summary drafts outside the classes, look at the note above about self-checking your summaries


    Special note for ASE I: 

    My apologies to all of you - there was one thing I should have reminded all of you today that I forgot! That is - on your displays, you should also put your summaries

    So have a section on the poster where you write your summary in small, but clearly readable print

    But remember to also write your final drafts of your summaries on the top part of the handout page with the classmates' evaluation page! This page you will cut out and hand in to me after we are finished with the presentations!


    This means you are writing the summary twice (2 times) - one time on a section of the poster, then the exact same summary one time again on the handout page with the classmates' evaluation. It is of course the same summary of the topic - no different!


    Sorry about this!


    I highly recommend that all of you keep practicing your spoken presentation delivery outside of the classes, and to practice with each other and help each other with encouragement and advice


    Take a look at the note below: 




    Now the following notes are for the AE2Y I classes only!

    AE2Y I:




    Extra notes:
    My apologies to all of you in the AE2Y I classes - there was one thing I forgot to remind all of you about today.

    On your displays, you should also put your summaries

    If you are making a small poster:
    Have a section on the poster where you write your summary in small, but clearly readable print

    If you are making a Power Point/KeyNote show:
    The same goes for any Power Point or KeyNote displays - your second (2nd) slide after the title slide should have the summary, like this

    Summary slide (Write your final draft of your summary here on the slide, in a 12-point size font) - 例えば:

    Summary 

    There have been many great partnerships, as well as rivalries, in the history of science and technology. Perhaps no rivalry was greater than that between Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla. While both figures are crucial in the development of the practical application of electricity to everyday life, this presentation/report will show that Edison may have been the greater figure given the numerous applications of electricity he made possible through his inventions. (71 words)

    Important note:
    Now please also have the same summary on your written composition (作文)! This means you are writing the summary twice (2 times) - one time on a section of the poster (if you are doing a poster) or one time on the second (2nd) slide of your slideshow (if you are doing a Power Point or KeyNote show) for 5/21, then one time again on your written composition paper for 5/28. 

    In both cases - either for poster presenters or slideshow presenters - then copy the same summary onto your writing report

    You do not have to change the summary! Copy it on your written report the way you had written it on your poster or slideshow. 

    So I hope these final notes can help you for next week! 

    One more reminder for AE2Y I students: We'll do the presentations next week on 5/21 - then hand in the written compositions on 5/28

    One more reminder for all students in both ASE and AE2Y I: You don't have to make an outline if you don't want to - but you will find it will help you with speaking from keywords and key phrases - so you might want to try it (but you don't have to)!

    I'll see all of you in ASE and AE2Y I next week with your great presentations!

    Take care!

    Images: Personal photographs. All rights reserved. 

    Monday, May 13, 2019

    電気通信大学 ASE & AE2Y I: More review about summaries & notes about outlines・要約、あらすじのレビュー ・ 付記

    Hello!



    How are you? Here is a review for all of you about summaries, with some new notes about outlines (あらすじ). This review, and these notes, are for both the ASE I and AE2Y I classes. 


    If you would like a refresher on what we did in both classes last week on 5/7, click on this link here.

    As a preview - look at this example in the screenshot at the top of a completed outline, with a title
    While I have not talked much about outlines, I have included notes about it here because I have decided that you may use an outline in your presentation - but with only keywords and key phrases! 


    First, let's review about summaries! Then I'll include a few more notes about outlines after. 


    Review about summaries

    Think of a summary as a statement of purpose (SOP) about your presentation or writing topic. It should be a compacted version of every aspect of your topic. 

    Firstshow some background to the topic:

    例えば:There have been many great partnerships, as well as rivalries, in the history of science and technology. Perhaps no rivalry was greater than that between Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla.

    Nextshow a connection between the background and what you will present or write about:


    There have been many great partnerships, as well as rivalries, in the history of science and technology. Perhaps no rivalry was greater than that between Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla. While both figures are crucial in the development of the practical application of electricity to everyday life…


    Thencome in with what you will directly present or write about:


    There have been many great partnerships, as well as rivalries, in the history of science and technology. Perhaps no rivalry was greater than that between Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla. While both figures are crucial in the development of the practical application of electricity to everyday life, this presentation/report will show that Edison may have been the greater figure given the numerous applications of electricity he made possible through his inventions.


    This summary runs to only 71 words in total. But it shows completely the background to the topic, and the presenter's or writer's purpose with the topic.


    This is what you should try for in the final versions of your summary writing

    Notes on outlines

    Now here's a little more about outlines.

    Take a look again at the example in the screenshot at the top. While it is a little small, you can expand it on your screen.


    I have labeled what each of the sections, main ideas/subheadings, supporting points, and details of supporting points mean, and how they are organized together in the outline. 


    The language in an outline should be cut down to the minimum - no complete sentences and only keywords and key phrases. An outline really is a guideline of points for your presentation topic, so it should be as concise (簡明) as possible.


    Important note: You do not have to make an outline for this presentation. But you will find that it will be easier to speak on your topic with an outline, as a good outline will show only keywords or key phrases and can help you keep yourself away from reading from lots of notes.
      
    This is what the final version of an outline should look like - keywords and key phrases only! 

    I hope these notes can help you with your presentation preparation. Good luck!

    Image: Screenshot of original Word document. All rights reserved.

    Saturday, May 11, 2019

    東京理科大学 Writing & Composition 1a: Writing assignment 1・作文1

    Hello!

     

    How are you? Today I will show you our first (1st) writing assignment (作文1) for this class - writing your opinion, with support for your opinion, on a topic connected to the themes from the textbook in the listening and speaking class

    Before we start, if you like another refresher on what we did in our 5/6 classes, click on this link


    Themes (テーマ)
    Here are your choice of themes. You can choose one (1) of these
    • International relations 
    • The environment
    There are many topics you can choose from that fit with these themes. You can use a topic from one of the textbook chapters we have done so far in this class, plus any ideas you may have gotten from your listening and speaking class on the same textbook chapters. 

    But here are also some other ideas for topics that fit with these themes and that you can try for. You could choose one (1) of these if you want
    • Refugee resettlement in Japan (or another country)
    • Brexit
    • Work and effectiveness of a particular United Nations agency or of some famous NGOs such as the Red Cross or Doctors Without Borders
    • Relief work and resettlement of people from Fukushima and Miyagi after the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami
    • The impact of climate change on Japan

    Deadline (締め切り)
    It will be by the end of class on May 27th (5/27), so you have two (2) week(s) to prepare. You should have a rough draft (下書き) for next week (5/20), then have your final draft ready on 5/27.

    *NEW NOTE: I know that some of you have a laptop computer or tablet, but not all of you do. So if you have your own computer or laptop, work on your final drafts, and bring your computer or laptop with you, with a USB, to class next week on 5/27.

    If you don't have your own computer, bring a USB with you. Outside of class before next week, you should work on your writing on a campus computer, and save your Word file on your USB.
    Your final draft for 5/27 will be typed on Word, and should be at least 3-4 paragraphs (段落) long - but if you can go longer, try for it! I encourage you to go longer and build your writing and take your ideas out further as much as you can.
    Anything shorter than three (3) paragraphs will not be acceptable. I will ask you to re-write if you bring in less writing than what the assignment asks for. 

    Please also do not write line-by-line sentences. Remember that you are writing paragraphs (段落), not lists of sentences. I will also ask you to re-write if you hand in a paper that has only lists of sentences on it. 

    I will show you guidelines in class on 5/27 about Word formatting for your final drafts.

    Guidelines

    1. Prepare a rough draft about the topic you want to write on about a problem or situation, and your opinion of it, and especially try to propose a solution. I will give you some time to do some research, and begin writing, in class.

    Important note:
    The rough and final drafts should have: 
    • A short introduction showing what your topic is
    • One (1) major problem or situation about it, with some details or important points about it
    • Your opinion about it, with your idea or ideas on solutions or extra actions to the problem or situation
    Things to think about:
    How big is the problem? What is the situation? What is your opinion about what might happen if nothing is done about it?  

    For negative opinions - if you feel that not enough is being done about the problem or situation, or if you feel that the wrong things are being done - that you should try to show some possible solutions to the problem or situation, and support your opinion with facts and/or data.  


    2. Be ready with your rough draft next week to read aloud to your classmates, and discuss your opinions and ideas. You do not have to agree with each other! Getting differing viewpoints from your classmates is important, and can help you to deepen your ideas. 

    * This is very important! You don't have to have your rough draft 100% finished - but you have to have enough content so you can read aloud and discuss your writing! Do not come in with only 1-2 sentences!


    3. Based on the discussions and any feedback you get from your classmates, then finalize your rough drafts outside of class into final drafts, and be ready to hand in on the deadline day on 5/27

    Now here are the lesson board notes from our class today (5/13):



      Good luck! See you next time!


      Images: top - courtesy of public-domain.com/Board notes - personal photograph. All rights reserved.

      東京理科大学 Listening & Speaking・Writing & Composition 1a: National parks・国立・国際公園

      Hello!



      How are you? Today, let's look at national parks (国際・国立公園) in different countries.

      Before we start, if you would like another refresher on what we did in our 5/6 classes, click on this link.

      The picture above shows the famous Itsukushima Shrine, which all of you know. But did you know that it is within a national park? It's in Setonaikai National Park. Have you ever been there? If you have been to Itsukushima Shrine, then you have been to a national park.

      Activity
      Do you know where these places are? These are pictures from national parks in different countries. Can you guess which countries they are in? 

      Talk about these places with your classmates! What are some things you think you could see or do in these places? 

      For the writing and composition students - after you talk, choose two (2) of these places and write about the things you believe you can see or do in them.

      1.

      2.

      3.

      4.

      5.

      Have fun with these!

      Discussion circles (for Listening & Speaking 1a)

      Now here are the literary circle discussion questions and vocabulary about national parks

      Please remember again that if there are only three (3) members in your group, the leader should also be the vocabulary master. The details master or summarizer should then ask the leader about vocabulary.


      Leader questions

      For the summarizer
      Are you ready to summarize the reading/CD lecture? (Can you give us your summary of the reading/CD lecture?) 

      For the details master
      1. What is the purpose of national parks?
      2. Where are they created? 
      3. Which country created the first national park? 
      * When was it created? 
      4. Which country created the first national park service? 
      * When was it created?

      (Leaders - think of two (2) more questions of your own from the lecture or reading to ask the details master!

      For the vocabulary master
      1. What does conservation mean? 
      2. What does IUCN stand for? 
      3. What is a hot spring
      4. What is a population?

      (Leaders - think of two (2) more words of your own from the lecture or reading to ask the vocabulary master!

      Now here are the lesson board notes from the Listening & Speaking 1a class today (5/13): 




      See you next time! 

      Images: Top - By Jordy Meow - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=30863836/1. By Ji-Elle - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=31072619/2. By Yakuzakorat - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=40268098/3. By Mario Roberto Duran Ortiz Mariordo - Own work, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3723082/4. By Jaganjac - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7586211/5. By Ansgar Walk - photo taken by Ansgar Walk, CC BY 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1109409/Board notes - personal photograph. All rights reserved.